Mechatronics Seminar
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Calculating/Modeling Micro/nano-scale Effects in Fluid Transport

Speaker: Asst. Prof. Dr. Murat Barışık

Title:Calculating/Modeling Micro/nano-scale Effects in Fluid Transport

Date/Time: November 9th, 1:40pm - 2:30pm

Place:  Sabanci University, FENS G015

Recently developed small devices from electro-mechanics to biomedical fields using micro/nano-scale physics provide multiple advantages over their macro-scale counterparts, while offering higher efficiencies and simplicity in operations. However, as the size decreases, complications arise in ongoing transport behaviors. Specifically, the non-equilibrium behaviors in fluid dynamics developing due to the disturbance from a surface become non-negligible such that the classical continuity based theories cannot resolve the heat or mass transport at micro/nano-scales. The small scale effects in a liquid and gas flow develop differently so that the characterization and calculation of non-equilibrium in liquid and gas cases require understanding different nano-scale mechanisms. For both liquid and gas cases, this presentation will focus on the fundamental mechanisms at molecular levels to resolve nano-physics using molecular dynamics (MD), calculate their effects and contributions into the transport as a function of system size (ranging between few nanometers to micrometers), and finally, study possible engineering definitions and their applicability limits/conditions for modeling micro/nano-scale effects in fluid transport.
Simply, we will study micro/nano scale gas flows, their existing applications, surface/gas interactions and rarefaction mechanisms at molecular levels; characterize gas flows based on Knudsen, Mach and newly introduced B numbers; discuss possible methodologies to solve heat and mass transport at various scales and conditions; and describe micro/nano scale effects on transport. Following, we will look at micro/nano scale liquid flows, their application range, non-equilibrium behaviors observed (i.e. Density Layering and Electric Double Layer) and their extent into liquid domain, possible solution methods to calculate transport, and possible techniques to consider micro/nano scale effects (i.e. updated viscosity, velocity slip and temperature jump) as a function of surface energy. Finally, we will investigate micro/nano scale engineered surface wetting for an active/passive control of transport. Overall, results come from published three book chapters and twenty journal articles, and ongoing theses’ studies of eight graduate students from Micro/Nano Engineering Laboratory. 

Abstract

Recently developed small devices from electro-mechanics to biomedical fields using micro/nano-scale physics provide multiple advantages over their macro-scale counterparts, while offering higher efficiencies and simplicity in operations. However, as the size decreases, complications arise in ongoing transport behaviors. Specifically, the non-equilibrium behaviors in fluid dynamics developing due to the disturbance from a surface become non-negligible such that the classical continuity based theories cannot resolve the heat or mass transport at micro/nano-scales. The small scale effects in a liquid and gas flow develop differently so that the characterization and calculation of non-equilibrium in liquid and gas cases require understanding different nano-scale mechanisms. For both liquid and gas cases, this presentation will focus on the fundamental mechanisms at molecular levels to resolve nano-physics using molecular dynamics (MD), calculate their effects and contributions into the transport as a function of system size (ranging between few nanometers to micrometers), and finally, study possible engineering definitions and their applicability limits/conditions for modeling micro/nano-scale effects in fluid transport.
Simply, we will study micro/nano scale gas flows, their existing applications, surface/gas interactions and rarefaction mechanisms at molecular levels; characterize gas flows based on Knudsen, Mach and newly introduced B numbers; discuss possible methodologies to solve heat and mass transport at various scales and conditions; and describe micro/nano scale effects on transport. Following, we will look at micro/nano scale liquid flows, their application range, non-equilibrium behaviors observed (i.e. Density Layering and Electric Double Layer) and their extent into liquid domain, possible solution methods to calculate transport, and possible techniques to consider micro/nano scale effects (i.e. updated viscosity, velocity slip and temperature jump) as a function of surface energy. Finally, we will investigate micro/nano scale engineered surface wetting for an active/passive control of transport. Overall, results come from published three book chapters and twenty journal articles, and ongoing theses’ studies of eight graduate students from Micro/Nano Engineering Laboratory.
Biographical Information
Dr. Murat Barisik received his B.S. and M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey in 2006 and 2008, respectively. In May 2012, he obtainedhis Ph.D. degree from Old Dominion University, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering where he graduated in the first rank and received the"Faculty Award in Aerospace Engineering 2012".He continued to support the ODU Institute of Micro and Nanotechnology as a Research Scientist for more than a year. After which, he worked as an Assistant Research Professor in Southern Methodist University Mechanical Engineering Department in Dallas, TX for one year. With the support from Marie Curie COFUND Fellowship, Dr. Barisik moved to Izmir Institute of Technology Mechanical Engineering Department as an Assistant Professor.