L.Sevgi; "Modelling&Simulation Strategies for Radar...", May 24, 2007
  • FENS
  • L.Sevgi; "Modelling&Simulation Strategies for Radar...", May 24, 2007

You are here

Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences
FENS SEMINARS
IEEE SEMINAR
 

Modelling and Simulation Strategies for Radar Cross-section (RCS) Prediction and Reduction

by

Prof.Dr. Levent Sevgi
DoğuşUniversity, Electronics and Communication Engineering Department


Date: Thursday, May 24, 2007
Time: 13.30
Place: Sabancı University FENS G035

 Antennas and Propagation Society
Electron Devices Society
Microwave Theory and
Techniques Society
Electromagnetic
Compatibility Society


Modelling and Simulation Strategies for Radar Cross-section (RCS) Prediction and Reduction


Abstract:
This short course discusses modeling and numerical simulation approaches for RCS prediction and reduction. EM sensors use the information, extracted from EM wave - material interaction in radar technology. This is called target reflectivity and is specified in terms of radar cross section (RCS). RCS is the area a target would have to occupy to produce the amount of reflected power (echo) that is detected back at the radar. RCS of a target is dependent upon several factors, such as, viewing direction, radar transmit signal polarization and frequency, size, geometry, and, composition of the target, etc. Radar Cross Section (RCS) plays an essential role in understanding EM phenomena and designing radars operating in different frequency regions. RCS modeling and reduction is crucial in designing "low visible" (stealth) weapon systems in defense technologies, such as combat aircraft and/or missiles. Novel FDTD- and MoM-based RCS prediction virtual analysis tools will be presented. The packages can be used in RCS investigation of various targets. The FDTD- and MoM-based RCS prediction tools are highly attractive and effective in the resonance and up to quasi-optical regimes. It is interesting to do RCS prediction tests, especially with the stealth targets (targets with reduced RCS). The RCS of a B26 bomber exceeds 35 dBm2 (3100 m2) from certain aspect angles, but is about – 40 dB m2 for the B2 stealth aircraft if the radar operates in the microwave frequencies. On the other hand, HF radars (especially, HFSKYR) have anti-stealth capabilities. Numerical modeling and simulation of the RCS prediction of stealth and anti-stealth targets can be done with the model-generation algorithm and the FDTD-based simulators introduced in this lecture.

Abstract:This short course discusses modeling and numerical simulation approaches for RCS prediction and reduction. EM sensors use the information, extracted from EM wave - material interaction in radar technology. This is called target reflectivity and is specified in terms of radar cross section (RCS). RCS is the area a target would have to occupy to produce the amount of reflected power (echo) that is detected back at the radar. RCS of a target is dependent upon several factors, such as, viewing direction, radar transmit signal polarization and frequency, size, geometry, and, composition of the target, etc. Radar Cross Section (RCS) plays an essential role in understanding EM phenomena and designing radars operating in different frequency regions. RCS modeling and reduction is crucial in designing "low visible" (stealth) weapon systems in defense technologies, such as combat aircraft and/or missiles. Novel FDTD- and MoM-based RCS prediction virtual analysis tools will be presented. The packages can be used in RCS investigation of various targets. The FDTD- and MoM-based RCS prediction tools are highly attractive and effective in the resonance and up to quasi-optical regimes. It is interesting to do RCS prediction tests, especially with the stealth targets (targets with reduced RCS). The RCS of a B26 bomber exceeds 35 dBm2 (3100 m2) from certain aspect angles, but is about – 40 dB m2 for the B2 stealth aircraft if the radar operates in the microwave frequencies. On the other hand, HF radars (especially, HFSKYR) have anti-stealth capabilities. Numerical modeling and simulation of the RCS prediction of stealth and anti-stealth targets can be done with the model-generation algorithm and the FDTD-based simulators introduced in this lecture.

Levent Sevgi’s Biography:
Levent Sevgi was born in Akhisar on January 1, 1958. He received his B.S.E.E., M.S.E.E. and Ph.D. degrees in Electronic Engineering from Istanbul Technical University (ITU) in 1982, 1984 and 1990, and, became assistant, associate and full professor in 1991, 1996 and 2002, respectively. Since Feb 2002, he has been with Electronics and Communication Engineering Department of Engineering Faculty of the Doğuº University in Kadýkoy - Istanbul. In 1987, while working on his Ph.D. he was awarded a fellowship that allowed him to work with Prof. L. B. Felsen at Weber Research Institute / New York Polytechnic University York for two years. His work at the Polytechnic concerned the propagation phenomena in non-homogeneous open and closed waveguides. He was with the ITU Foundation Center for Defense Studies from 1993 to 1997, for the design and implementation of a maritime integrated surveillance system for Turkish Navy, and from 2000-2002 for the Vessel Traffic Management System installation for Turkish Straits. He was with the Scientific Research Group of Raytheon Systems Canada from Sep 1998 till Jun 1999, during the field trials of the Canadian East Coast Integrated Maritime Surveillance System based on surface wave HF Radars. He joined TUBITAK-MRC, Information Technologies Research Institute of the Turkish Scientific Research and Technology Council as the Chair of Electronic Systems Department in Jun 1999 and spent there nearly two years. His research study has focused on propagation in complex environments, analytical and numerical methods in electromagnetics and radar systems, EMC/EMI modeling and measurement, surface wave HF radars, FDTD, TLM, SSPE and MoM techniques and their applications, RCS modeling, bio-electromagnetics. He is also interested in novel approaches in engineering education, teaching electromagnetics via virtual tools, and in teaching popular science lectures like Science, Technology and Society. He has authored or co-authored more than 70 papers in journals, and 60 papers in international conferences, an IEEE book, two book chapters, 5 books in Turkish. He is a member of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society Education Committee.

This seminar is presented by the Turkey Section of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc., (IEEE) and Sabanci University IEEE Student Branch. For more information, please contact
İbrahim Tekin
Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences
Sabancı University 34956 Orhanlı, Tuzla, Istanbul, Turkey
Tel: 90-216-483 9534
Fax: 90-216-483-9550
e-mail: tekin@sabanciuniv.edu